Monthly Archives: July 2010

Missing friends and visiting Guangzhou

Yesterday out of nowhere Jie-jie created a large pile of her toys and trinkets and started wrapping up presents to send to her friend from Guangzhou, Zheng Xia Mei (or something like that in pinyin). She said that she misses … Continue reading

Posted in Ex-Pat Parenting | Leave a comment

Central Vermont Chinese School?

Given the fact that every other day I learn of some other person with Chinese-speaking children (first generation kids, kids with one Chinese-speaking parent, recent adoptees, etc) who would like to help their children maintain some of the language skills … Continue reading

Posted in Speaking and Learning Chinese | 2 Comments

Entertaining Chinese Guests

Just before we left last summer we hosted a dinner party for the VLS China Program’s visiting faculty and students (visiting from China). As I was finishing up my dissertation and too busy to cook, we had the event catered. … Continue reading

Posted in Food, Interculturalism | 5 Comments

Out with the old

The New York Times is covering the leveling of another historic district of Beijing. Read the article here. As I read this I noted the disdain for Chinese-style urban redevelopment, the recognition that the Chinese living in the old housing … Continue reading

Posted in China in the News, Culture Shock, Musings | Leave a comment

Speaking Chinese

Things have been so busy since we returned home that we haven’t had much opportunity to get the kids into setting where they can speak and hear Chinese. We haven’t even found time to sit them in front of the … Continue reading

Posted in Ex-Pat Parenting, Speaking and Learning Chinese | Leave a comment

Blogging China

So, as you may have read in his last post, Jason appears to be done with vermont2china and has abandoned us for his private endeavor (www.czarnezki.com). I am planning to stick around for the time being. There is still much … Continue reading

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Lockdown for Chinese Migrants

In stark contrast to the elite gated communities in which wealthy Chinese and ex-pats reside, Beijing boasts an increasing number of gated villages – poor neighborhoods inhabited by large numbers of migrant workers. Ostensibly to control crime, the villages are … Continue reading

Posted in Chinese Labor | Leave a comment